Tuesday, June 9, 2015

How Do Authors Create Book Illustrations?



Thank you for stopping by to see another Behind the Scenes blog post.  I am always working on multiple projects simultaneously and wanted to provide a sneak peak of the process of creating illustrations.


My eleven-year-old daughter Jaden is the artist this time.  Just like me, she loves to draw.  She is creating the mock up for a short graphic novel book about ratios that will be released soon.  


She did her overall sketches.  Then, she added specific details.


Next, I will use Adobe Illustrator to outline, scan, and color the images.  Or, I might use watercolors.


If you are interested in drawing or creating your own illustrations, I would highly recommend gouache.  They are commonly used professionally to create children's book illustrations because they produce vivid and bright colors.

I highly recommend using high quality watercolor water as well.  This is my absolute favorite ~Blick 140 lb. paper.

Sunday, May 17, 2015

Task Cards That Are Organized By Guided Reading Levels


A year ago when I was working with my first graders, I wished that there were task cards that were organized by guided reading and Lexile levels.  There are so many books that are organized this way.  That is when I decided to create my own.  These task cards save so much planning time and make it easier to differentiate instruction.  




Inference Task Cards 




Main Idea Version
  







Sunday, April 5, 2015

April Showers Bring...Math Centers!

April showers bring...math problems! Let William show your class how to use Lift-the-Flap math problems with this adorable two-minute video!
 
First he'll show you how to use the manipulatives to make a chart with number combinations. 


Then he'll show you how to make your own math problem. 
You can use these in centers or small groups.

Get the set of six problems on the new Educents Marketplace!




  Please leave a comment if you enjoyed the video!

Saturday, March 21, 2015

Center Saturday

My weekly post called 
Center Saturday
 is up and ready for your reading pleasure.
Check out these Math Centers from the week.
http://www.sharingkindergarten.com/2015/03/center-saturday.html

Sending you smiles,
http://www.sharingkindergarten.com/2015/03/center-saturday.html
from
 
http://www.sharingkindergarten.com/2015/03/center-saturday.html

Friday, March 13, 2015

Do the "Alligator SLAP!" {Math Center for Comparing Numbers}


How about a fun, fast pace game for practicing number comparisons?

Enter in:  Alligator SLAP!

Just print, prepare and sit back and watch your students get excited with this fun center.
Students race to be the first to slap "less than,"  "equal to," or "greater than" when comparing their cards.

The game is provided in color as well as black and white.
You can see all the details here.


The Classroom Game Nook


Wednesday, March 11, 2015

Multiplication BINGO! {Includes FREEBIE}

Hi friends!
I'm Rachael from The Classroom Game Nook.

Are your students struggling with their multiplication facts?  I've got a fun and easy center that you can use to help your students learn their facts, and enjoy doing it:

 


 The beauty of the game is that your students actually create their individual board, so it works great in centers, or if you want your whole class to play, you can do that, too!




Want a FREEBIE to get you started?  Head over to this post to download your starter kit.

To check out the whole set - see all the details here.


The Classroom Game Nook

Tuesday, March 10, 2015

Glyphs Are a Form of Graphing!






Sometimes I think that teachers believe a glyph is just a fun activity, but in reality glyphs are a non-standard way of graphing a variety of information to tell a story. It is a flexible data representation tool that uses symbols to represent different data. Glyphs are an innovative instrument that shows several pieces of data at once and requires a legend/key to understand the glyph. The creation of glyphs requires problem solving, communication, and data organization.

Remember coloring pages where you had to color in each of the numbers or letters using a key to color certain areas or coloring books that were filled with color-by-numbers? Believe it or not, these pages were a type of glyph.

For St. Patrick's Day I have created a Pot of Gold glyph. Not only is it a type of graph, but it is also
Glyph for St. Patrick's Day
an excellent activity for reading and following directions. The glyph requires the children to draw, color, or glue different items on the Pot of Gold starting point. Students are to finish this glyph using the seven categories listed below.

1) How Do You Come to School?
2) Shamrocks (age)
3) Rainbow (favorite colors)
4) Boy or Girl?
5) Coloring the Leprechaun’s Hat (like to read?)
6) Coloring Your Gold (hair color)
7) Name

If you are interested, just click under the resource cover page seen above.







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